Police Science : Newsletter
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Police Science : Newsletter No. 209, July 2017
 
An innovative cooperation product by TC TeamConsult, Geneva/Zurich - CH and Freiburg, D www.tc-teamconsult.com and the chair for criminology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Prof. Dr. Thomas Feltes), http://www.kriminologie.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/ as well as master's programs Kriminologie und Polizeiwissenschaft and Criminal Justice, Governance and Police Science at Ruhr-Universität Bochum.
 

 
1) War on Cops?
2) Refugees as Victims
3) Neighbourhood context of serious assaults on police
4) Statistics on People Fatally Shot by Police in Germany
5) Assessing the Effectiveness of High-Profile Targeted Killings in the “War on Terror”
6) Policing mental health problems at crime hot spots
7) What Works in Crime Prevention and Rehabilitation
8) The effectiveness of burglary security devices
9) Police and Xenophobia
10) 'Big Up The Bill' campaign for positive policing
11) Procedural Justice as an Indicator for Trust in Policing
12) Reporting Behaviour of Migrants
13) Limited Gain in Knowledge through Neurocriminology
14) Illnesses on the Increase

 
1) War on Cops?
Police agencies in the U.S. are currently facing a major legitimacy crisis resulting from a spate of high-profile use of force incidents, many involving minority citizens. Recent headlines emphasize that there is now a “war on cops” and that police officers are facing increasing levels of hostility and violence fueled by a growing anti-police sentiment. A study using time series analysis provide no evidence for a “Ferguson Effect” on the number of U.S. police officers murdered in the line of duty as of March 2016. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07418825.2016.1236205
 
 
2) Refugees as Victims
People who are trying to access the EU in search of safety and dignity are being routinely abused by law enforcement officials in countries in the Western Balkans. State agents responsible for upholding fundamental rights are instead subjecting people to violence and intimidation and denying access to asylum procedures to those seeking international protection. https://www.oxfam.de/system/files/balkan-bericht_a_dangerous_game_0.pdf
 
 
3) Neighbourhood context of serious assaults on police
While evidence of social structural factors influencing violence against police exists, few studies spatially explore this phenomenon with geographical aggregations smaller than the city level. Maps show that incidents tend to cluster spatially, and multivariate analyses suggest that concentrated disadvantage and calls for service, but not other indicators, were significantly related to violence against the police. To decrease injurious assault on police, police administrators may want to refocus community policing efforts. While police are unable to eradicate poverty and other structural social problems, they are in a unique position to work with a variety of local government agencies to alleviate community concerns. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2017.1333120
 
 
4) Statistics on People Fatally Shot by Police in Germany
Every five and a half weeks an individual in Germany is fatally shot by police. A dossier by the German daily taz compiled the facts and assessed them. According to the taz’ researches, since 1990 at least 269 individuals in Germany died by shots from the police. The victims are almost exclusively male, rarely are they owning a gun themselves. And more and more frequently, persons with mental illnesses are affected. https://taz.atavist.com/polizeitote#chapter-1957584
 
 
5) Assessing the Effectiveness of High-Profile Targeted Killings in the “War on Terror”
Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, and the ensuing “war on terrorism,” the U.S. government has engaged in a series of controversial counterterrorism policies. Research has yet to establish that this type of tactic is effective, even among high-profile targets. This study found that these types of killings primarily yielded negligible effects. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-9133.12274/full
 
 
6) Policing mental health problems at crime hot spots
The police often come into contact with people suffering from mental health and substance abuse problems and there is evidence to suggest that these individuals are concentrated in small geographic units. The purpose of the current research is to present a proactive co-responder approach that addresses mental health problems concentrated in crime hot spots. Police officers were paired with mental health clinicians to spend time in hot spots in an effort to connect people who suffer from mental health and substance abuse problems to services and rebuild trust between the police and community. http://www.polizei-newsletter.de/links.php?L_ID=436
 
 
7) What Works in Crime Prevention and Rehabilitation
Just four decades ago, the predominant narrative in crime prevention and rehabilitation was that nothing works. Since that time, criminologists have accumulated a wide body of evidence about programs and practices in systematic reviews. This article summarizes what is known in seven broad criminal justice areas by drawing on 118 systematic reviews. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-9133.12298/abstract
 
 
8) The effectiveness of burglary security devices
This study measures the effectiveness of anti-burglary security devices, both individually and in combination. It finds that, for individual devices, external lights and door double locks or deadlocks, are most effective but, counter-intuitively, burglar alarms and dummy alarms confer less protection than no security. Combinations of devices generate positive interaction effects that increase protection more than additively. In particular, combinations with door and window locks plus external lights or security chains confer at least 20 times greater protection against burglary with entry than no security. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/sj.2014.30?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals
 
 
9) Police and Xenophobia
In police research, dominant explanations of why law enforcers harbour xenophobic attitudes are most often dressed in cultural or political rationalizations. Based on an ethnographic study of Danish police detectives and their noticeable negativity towards foreign suspects, this article offers an additional explanation of xenophobia. It demonstrates how resentments are spurred not only by cultural prejudice or politics but also by the ways in which foreigners complicate quite ordinary yet, from a police perspective, valued work practices. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1362480617707947
 
 
10) 'Big Up The Bill' campaign for positive policing
‘She took time to listen to me, even if it took me four hours to explain’ - Young person describing positive police behaviour. The Children's Society is running a campaign called 'Big up the Bill' to highlight good examples of police work. The campaign draws attention to the huge difference a committed, empathetic and understanding police officer can make to a child’s life. Towards this goal, the Big Up The Bill campaign group has created tips for police on how to work better with children and young people. http://www.polizei-newsletter.de/links.php?L_ID=449
 
 
11) Procedural Justice as an Indicator for Trust in Policing
Scientific police research increasingly points to the fact that perception of police strongly depends on how just policing is perceived. The concept of “procedural justice“ was mainly tested in Western democracies. A current study from Nigeria is now confirming this assumption for areas with a rather weak social cohesion and thus shows again that (perceived) legitimacy of police actions is a decisive factor in police-citizens-relationships. Akinlabi, O., Young people, procedural justice and police legitimacy in Nigeria, Policing and Society 2017, 419-438 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10439463.2015.1077836
 
 
12) Reporting Behaviour of Migrants
A US study deals with influencing factors on reporting behaviour of migrants. Generally, a great willingness to report crimes to the police could be established. Fear of crime and level of satisfaction with the police were identified as decisive for the actual reporting behaviour. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2015.1040795
 
 
13) Limited Gain in Knowledge through Neurocriminology
The results in neuroscience possess great attraction on criminological research due to their alleged exact measures. Nevertheless, many neuronal relations are still not clear enough to actually allow conclusions on human behaviour. http://www.polizei-newsletter.de/links.php?L_ID=446
 
 
14) Illnesses on the Increase
According to a current study, the figure of mental illnesses is increasing. About 60 per cent of employee representatives interviewed for this study reported employees in their organisation are suffering severely from time pressure and high work intensity. https://www.boeckler.de/pdf/p_wsi_report_33_2016.pdf