Police Science : Newsletter
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Police Science : Newsletter No. 212, November 2017
 
An innovative cooperation product by TC TeamConsult, Geneva/Zurich - CH and Freiburg, D www.tc-teamconsult.com and the chair for criminology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Prof. Dr. Thomas Feltes), http://www.kriminologie.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/ as well as master's programs Kriminologie und Polizeiwissenschaft and Criminal Justice, Governance and Police Science at Ruhr-Universität Bochum.
 

 
1) Restorative Justice Week
2) Role of social structural factors in influencing violence against police
3) Effects of Police Body-Worn Cameras (BWCs) on Response-to-Resistance
4) Extend Forensic DNA Analyses?
5) “Mystery Man“ in Identity Parades
6) Police Officers and Doormen
7) Social Media: A tool for COP in Post-Conflict Settings?
8) How Fake News (Cannot) be Corrected
9) Police Culture: Special Issue with Articles on Police Subculture
10) Institutional myths and generational boundaries: cultural inertia in the police organisation
11) European Drug Report 2017
12) CCTV as a tool for early police intervention
13) Drug supply reduction: an overview of EU policies and measures

 
1) Restorative Justice Week
This year’s Restorative Justice Week will take place from 19th till 26th November 2017 worldwide under the theme „Inspiring Innovation“. More information under: http://www.euforumrj.org/events/rj-week-2017/
 
 
2) Role of social structural factors in influencing violence against police
The study of census tracts of Baltimore, Maryland identified only concentrated disadvantage as a structural factor influencing serious assaults on police; yet, no correlation was found with residential mobility, immigration concentration and racial diversity. The study, however, found a correlation between calls for service and violence against police. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2017.1333120
 
 
3) Effects of Police Body-Worn Cameras (BWCs) on Response-to-Resistance
The current study provides a statistically rigorous program evaluation of the impact of police body-worn cameras (BWCs) on police response-to-resistance (e.g., use of force). Results indicate that BWC officers’ mean frequency of response-to-resistance decreased by 8.4%. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01639625.2016.1248711
 
 
4) Extend Forensic DNA Analyses?
Extending DNA analyses has been subject of controversial debate ever since the spectacular murder cases in the Freiburg area, Germany, in 2016. This article takes a look at the chances of an extension and the implications for law enforcement agencies but also the challenges and perspectives attached to it. http://www.polizei-newsletter.de/links.php?L_ID=466
 
 
5) “Mystery Man“ in Identity Parades
Usage of a silhouette in identity parades can have a positive impact on correct rejection in older adult eyewitnesses of line-ups in which the offender was not present. The probability of a correct identification moreover, if the offender is actually standing in the line-up, is not negatively impacted by using a “mystery man”. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11896-016-9214-9
 
 
6) Police Officers and Doormen
This article summarises the results of an ethnological dissertation on behaviour and strategies of doormen with potential sources of “annoyance”, which may include police officers. Advantages and disadvantages of cooperating with police are always estimated by the doormen’s own perspective depending on the situation. http://www.polizei-newsletter.de/links.php?L_ID=467
 
 
7) Social Media: A tool for COP in Post-Conflict Settings?
7.    Social Media: A tool for COP in Post-Conflict Settings? Information and communication technologies have changed the way we communicate over the past decade. Social media plays an important role for the provision of security – for police agencies as much as for citizens. The same is true for post-conflict societies. This brief gives a number of examples of how social media is used by police agencies around the world. It examines the question of how these tools can best be implemented in the policing of post-conflict settings. http://www.polizei-newsletter.de/links.php?L_ID=468
 
 
8) How Fake News (Cannot) be Corrected
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania are showing ways of how to correct fake news in a meta analysis – and which ways do not have the desired effect. According to the researchers, it is not very helpful to simply highlight information as “fake”. If one wants to tackle fake news successfully, one should provide an alternative explanation. If this happens in the shape of a story, the rumour in people’s minds will be replaced to the same extent. http://sz.de/1.3677301
 
 
9) Police Culture: Special Issue with Articles on Police Subculture
A special issue of “Policing” magazine summarises theoretical and empirical contributions on “Police Culture”. The contributions deal, among other things, with theoretical and historical development of “cop culture” research, influence of informal norms on responding to emergency calls and the significance of “masculinity” in officers’ every day working life. https://academic.oup.com/policing/issue/11/3
 
 
10) Institutional myths and generational boundaries: cultural inertia in the police organisation
This article provides an account for ‘cultural inertia’ – a reluctance to adapt to changing environmental conditions – in policing, despite a time of considerable demographic, policy, and practical reform. Drawing on 100 interviews and observation data collected over the course of 18 months of field work in a police department of a medium-sized Canadian city, the author argue that the status quo is sustained by high-rank ‘old-school’ officers through a delicate balancing of both old and new cultural scripts and through the preservation of certain institutional myths. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10439463.2017.1371718
 
 
11) European Drug Report 2017
This report by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction is available on the Internet here: http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/edr2017_en
 
 
12) CCTV as a tool for early police intervention
This study explores the prospect of utilizing CCTV as an early intervention mechanism to detect and disrupt street-level activity that can lead to violence. The findings suggest that the benefits offered by CCTV, namely the instantaneous discovery and reporting of crime, may be rendered inconsequential by the process times associated with the differential-response policy of police dispatch. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/sj.2014.17?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals
 
 
13) Drug supply reduction: an overview of EU policies and measures
Illicit drug markets have a global reach. This paper provides an overview of EU policies and responses to the production and trafficking of illicit drugs within the international context. The EU is involved in a range of projects and initiatives around the world designed to reduce the supply of illicit drugs, including capacity building initiatives targeting smuggling routes and measures to support economic, legislative, and monitoring infrastructural development. http://ibz.fb.emailing.belgium.be/c3277/e2804052/hf6a1f/l121790/document.pdf