Police Science : Newsletter
2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 |
213, December 2017 | 212 | 211 | 210 | 209 | 208 | 207 | 206 | 205 | 204 | 203
Police Science : Newsletter No. 213, December 2017
 
An innovative cooperation product by TC TeamConsult, Geneva/Zurich - CH and Freiburg, D www.tc-teamconsult.com and the chair for criminology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Prof. Dr. Thomas Feltes), http://www.kriminologie.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/ as well as master's programs Kriminologie und Polizeiwissenschaft and Criminal Justice, Governance and Police Science at Ruhr-Universität Bochum.
 

 
1) Macro trends in the smuggling of migrants into Europe
2) Violence and Police Operations in Emergency Accommodations
3) Artificial Intelligence in criminal intelligence? From predictive policing to AI perspectives
4) Facial Profiling: Race, Physical Appearance, and Punishment
5) Developmental trajectories of offenders convicted of fraud
6) Changes over time in the distribution of crime among individuals from different socioeconomic backgrounds
7) Perceived Risk of Sanctions in Youths
8) Neighbourhood Social Control and Perceptions of Crime and Disorder in Urban China
9) Strategic principles to criminal investigations
10) Drug dealers and humor
11) Study on Carrying of Concealed Firearms on a University Campus in the US
12) Underreporting of Homicides by Police in the United States

 
1) Macro trends in the smuggling of migrants into Europe
The article identifies the analytical and empirical features of the markets for smuggling services. It shows that these markets have the ability to expand considerably and often over a short period of time. The paper concludes by discussing some policy implications, including the adoption of land-based policies (regarded as more effective than naval operations). https://bulletin.cepol.europa.eu/index.php/bulletin/article/view/242
 
 
2) Violence and Police Operations in Emergency Accommodations
A number of contributions in issue 16, 3, 2017 in the magazine “Criminology and Public Policy” deal with the problems (with released prisoners among other things) in emergency accommodations und the public perception of these accommodations. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/capp.2017.16.issue-3/issuetoc
 
 
3) Artificial Intelligence in criminal intelligence? From predictive policing to AI perspectives
The scope of this paper is to describe the French development in predictive analysis and to open the potential use of artificial intelligence in different areas of criminal intelligence without avoiding the risk of its new development. https://bulletin.cepol.europa.eu/index.php/bulletin/article/view/244
 
 
4) Facial Profiling: Race, Physical Appearance, and Punishment
The article investigates the associations among physical appearance, threat perceptions, and criminal punishment. Findings indicate that Black defendants are perceived to be more threatening in appearance. Other facial characteristics, such as physical attractiveness, baby-faced appearance, facial scars, and visible tattoos, also influence perceptions of threat, as do criminal history scores. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-9125.12143/full
 
 
5) Developmental trajectories of offenders convicted of fraud
This study describes the criminal careers of offenders convicted of fraud, distinguishing different career dimensions such as intermittency, versatility and specialization. Results indicate that most fraud offenders are versatile in the sense that they also have significant criminal records for other serious offending (that is, not fraud). At the same time, they are also specialized in fraud. The classic divide between typical financial offenders and common criminals does not apply. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1477370816677620
 
 
6) Changes over time in the distribution of crime among individuals from different socioeconomic backgrounds
Results of this study show that crime trends differ by socioeconomic background: decreases in crime (theft offences) are greater among the more affluent, and increases (violent crime) are primarily located among the lower levels of the income distribution. Different mechanisms can contribute to an understanding of why crime has become increasingly concentrated among less affluent social groups. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1477370816682979
 
 
7) Perceived Risk of Sanctions in Youths
A sociological longitudinal study with four collection waves among 1950 students in Duisburg, Germany, has since 2002 been exploring the question in how far perceived risks of sanction influence delinquency. The partly surprising findings were published in the journal “Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie“ 2017 (69): 259-282. http://kzfss.uni-koeln.de/archiv/heft-2-jg-69-2017/
 
 
8) Neighbourhood Social Control and Perceptions of Crime and Disorder in Urban China
The article examines the effects of different forms of neighbourhood social control on different types of perceived disorder. Collective efficacy as a form of informal control has a significant effect only for perceived social disorder. Public control has a significant contextual effect on all forms of perceived disorder. Semipublic control affects all forms of perceived disorder. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/1745-9125.12142/abstract
 
 
9) Strategic principles to criminal investigations
Strategy is a wide collection of ideas and insights that have been used since time immemorial to face the ‘fog of war’. The analysis presented in this paper applied the concepts of strategy to criminal investigations. In order to apply them to modern criminal investigations, the paper borrowed ideas from historical masters of strategy: Sun Tzu and Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara; von Clausewitz, Lawrence ‘of Arabia’ and Mao Zedong, but also the doctrine of Special Forces. The paper wants to trigger a debate about the incorporation of strategic thinking into investigative practice and training. https://bulletin.cepol.europa.eu/index.php/bulletin/article/view/247
 
 
10) Drug dealers and humor
A study finds that humor facilitates identity work among illicit drug dealers in several ways. Humor is an important symbolic boundary marker distinguishing dealers from others they consider “stupid” or less circumspect. Drug dealers use denigrating humor in their narratives to distance their former and virtual identities from their present identities. Humor also reduces dealers’ perceptions of the threats posed by police and potential snitches. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-9125.12148/full
 
 
11) Study on Carrying of Concealed Firearms on a University Campus in the US
A socioscientific study examined the attitudes of university staff and faculty on the carrying of concealed firearms at a US university. The US have the widespread belief that self-arming of students and employees has a deterrent effect on criminals. This study identifies several factors which further this attitude, among them fear of violence, a high level of distrust in police and government as well as general political orientation. Source: De Angelis et al: Collective Security, Fear of Crime, and Support for Concealed Firearms on a University Campus in the Western United States. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0734016816686660
 
 
12) Underreporting of Homicides by Police in the United States
It is widely known that homicides by police are not accurately reported in the United States. FBI reports some 500 killings every year, as other sources mention 1.000 and more people killed by police. Measurement errors were the primary source of underreporting. If police involvement was not mentioned on death certificate, the death was misclassified as a civilian homicide. Source:  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1088767917693358